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Funny Dog Tags


 

We all know that a lost dog wearing dog tags on his or her collar has the best chance of coming home quicker. When your pet is missing, time is of the essence. The sooner your dog is returned to you, the better it is for them.

But while the dog tag plays such an important role in keeping your pup safe, that doesn't mean you can't have some fun at the same time. In fact, a set of funny dog tags can actually increase the likelihood that a passerby will not only notice your missing dog but urge that individual to stop and take a look at the tags. That contact between your lost dog and a Good Samaritan is the first and most important step towards a reunion with your beloved family member.

A funny or clever dog tag is a bold way to catch the eye of a stranger who might spot your pup wandering around aimlessly.

What Are Funny Things To Put On A Dog Tag?

The sky's the limit. You can put any sort of clever, irreverent, and silly phrase or pun on your dog tag. Be flippant, be provocative, be weird. Just as long as your dog's tags are as unique as your pup. There are many shapes of funny dog tags out there. Most tags are commonly available in simple shapes – round, square, oval, even rectangle.

But funny dog tags go one step further in the form of special shapes like a bone, a heart, a wine glass, a taco, even a cat face or a strawberry. Combining a fun shape with a short witty phrase can turn a simple functional means of ID into something a lot more charismatic and personal to you and your pooch.

You can have a short and funny message on your pet ID tag but don't let that interfere with placing all the information necessary for bringing the dog home again. Most funny dog tags will take up one whole side of the tag so you need to consider that you will have a single surface upon which you can write (or engrave) your pet's basic data.

What Should I Write On My Dog Tag?

Keep it very basic. You have an extremely limited amount of real estate upon which you can write what passersby need to read to help your dog find his or her way home. Now most tags would give you two sides to work from, but a funny dog tag is using one of those sides to be cute and cheeky.

With space at a premium on a tag that is often no larger than the size of a quarter, the tag has to be brief and informative. Here is what you need to include:

Your Phone Number

It remains the fastest method for someone to let you know they have found your missing dog. The phone number you include on the tag should be the one that is answered quickest. For most people, that would be their cell phone. A home or office number might be the second best choice, though if you have enough room to afford space for two numbers, you can have all of your bases covered.

Medical Information

TA dog that requires urgent medication or has some condition that places the animal in danger if he or she is on their own for an extended period of time should have this information on its tag. Again, you don't have a lot of space to work with, however, you should at least insist that someone call you if and when the dog is located. You can explain what is needed, in full, over the phone.

Microchip Information

The microchip is one of the fastest methods for bringing your dog home. Alerting someone who finds your dog that he or she has that microchip can make it easier to reunite your pet with your family in the event a passerby can't reach you at your provided phone number.

What Should You Not Put On A Dog Tag?

Here is where we address the growing debate over dog tags and what should or should not be included. The information you are including on the tag is now going to become public knowledge in a short period of time. But that's what you want. You are hoping someone calls your phone to say they have found your dog and would like to return him or her at your earliest convenience.

But the world we live in is not all sunshine and rainbows, and while most people have good hearts and helpful intentions, there are people out there who may not be so pleasant or accommodating. This brings us to the present bone of contention (ahem) over the proper way to prepare a dog tag: Do you or do you not put your address on your pet’s dog tag?

There are compelling arguments to each side of the debate. One the one hand, if your pup goes missing in your neighborhood, having your address listed on their ID tag is the fastest way for them to get home to you. One glance at the tag will inform anyone who sees it exactly where your dog belongs.

On the other hand, putting that kind of private information on your dog tag does mean that anyone who can get your dog to come near will know where home is. If your dog is easily coaxed by hearing his or her name called out loud, it’s easy for a stranger to approach them and find out your address. Not everyone feels comfortable with their home’s location being common knowledge.

This is why you may want to leave off your address from your dog’s tags. As much as you want to have your pup brought back, you may feel uncomfortable having a stranger come to your house with (or even without) your dog and find yourself in some kind of urgent trouble.

Should You Put Your Dog's Name On Its Tags?

The choice is ultimately yours. But regardless of what you end up doing, you need to consider the realities of your pet becoming lost. For those pet owners who live in large metropolitan cities, it may be a good idea not to put your pet's name on his or her tag and keep it to one or two phone numbers and medical concerns or microchip information.

However, if you live in a more secluded neighborhood where you have a closer knit community of neighbors and friends who might come across your dog after it has sneaked out without your knowledge, then you might want to put the dog's name on the tag. It helps to get people focused on bringing the dog home and knowing they have the right dog in question.

How Do You Make Dog Tags Not Jingle?

It's a common problem that many pet owners and even their dogs find rather annoying. Dog tags jingle jangle from even the slightest movement of your pet, whether they're standing up, running, even scratching an itch – those tags can really start to clang about.

One of the quick fix alternatives to jingling dog tags is to simply remove them. But while this may seem like an easy and harmless choice, you never know when your dog is going to get lost. Step outside for two seconds to get the mail or water a plant and before you even realize it, your dog has slipped out and is running loose. In seconds, your dog can leave the property and in minutes, your dog is officially lost.

Unfortunately, you removed his or her tags thinking the dog was home for the night and not going outside. Now your dog is running loose outdoors with absolutely no means of identification or method for contacting you should he or she be located.

There are options without having to remove the tags. Here are a few ways to mute the noise of dangling, jangling dog ID tags.

Rubber Band or Tape

Take both tags, rubber band or Scotch tape, and use them to connect them together so they aren't jingling but you know they can always be noticed and read should your pup get out of your home. Just be careful you don't have a worn out rubber band that can snap off. And ensure that you have the tags secured in a way that prevents them from rubbing against one another, which could wear away the engraving.

Tag Covers

Do you know what those rubber covers look like for your house-keys? Well some companies have developed a similar rubber cover for dog tags. Slip these on and that will severely mute the jingle-jangle that's driving everyone crazy. If you can't find a dedicated dog tag cover for sale, you may just want to try those key covers. They may be just as effective.

Tag Pouch

Dog tags are connected to the dog collar with a snap, an S-hook, or some other connecting device. But those pet tags just won't stop being so loud. So place the tags in a dog collar tag pouch and connect the pouch directly to the collar. This alternative allows for the tags to be read on the dog should he or she go missing, but they are contained in a pouch where they can be read and replaced.